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Exceptional Butter Churn in Original Red Paint

Simply the Best! . . . Butter Churn, found in Maine, made of Eastern White Pine, Swamp Ash and Maple. Circa 1800 -1830, still retaining its original Red Paint. Staved and Hoop construction with buttonhole laps and a high, slender tub having a cover through which the plunger is worked.
The churn still retains most of its original paint . . . after almost 200 years!
Soooo, now let's talk paint. Call it "Indian Red" after the Indians who introduced the paint to the colonists or call it "Turkey Red" from the  red wattle of the turkey.  The Indians discovered the preservative qualities in red clay and shared this with the colonists who made their paint  in a manner similar to the Indians. Finding that the red paint protected wood, they soon began painting the coffins in which they buried their dead and thus the additional name of  "Coffin Red" was added to the list.  "Indian, Turkey, or Coffin" Red, it definitely is a red with longevity. 

 

 

 


The dasher/plunger is received by a beautifully turned ovoid funnel (rim tapers inward to prevent splashing), the funnel pierces the slightly domed fitted lid.  The staves, one projecting and flaring like a piggen type handle are bound by four buttonhole joined hoops and one hoop at the rim having a tapered finger terminus. A box that was staved had a chance to expand with the moisture and the buttonhole laps allowed for this expansion. Churn/Dasher height 52.75": churn height: 24.75": base diameter: 12.5".


 

Made by a master cooper,  this churn demonstrates a high standard of ability as well artistry.  It is a wonderful example of a utilitarian item that has withstood the ravages of use and the test of time.  A true survivor and stellar example to add to any collection of Country Americana.
$2450.00
R22C290061                                                                                           Questions?  Ask the Ferret!
                                                                                                                       

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